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in san francisco bay is still very much an icon. rick folbaum has more from our new york city newsroom. rick? >> reporter: well, given its iconic place in history, it's kind of surprising that alcatraz was only an active federal prison for 29 years, but it certainly earned its reputation as the rock as it was called, or devil's island was another nickname. according to prison official, nobody ever successfully escaped from alcatraz, though a lot of people tried. take a look at this old clip from fox movie tone news. >> alcatraz, the federal penalty ri in san francisco bay, or the rock as it's also known the criminal world, stands humiliated today in its boast of maximum security. the victim of the ingenuity of three convicts who mocked its break-proof claims to make good their escape. >> reporter: those inmates are said to have actually gotten away on a raft, though to this day they've never been found. on march 31, 1963, then-attorney general robert kennedy decided to shut down alcatraz. it had simply become too expensive to operate, more than three times what other federal prisons we
quick, jonathan, i'm from earthquake country out in san francisco. when there is an earthquake, often times there is aftershocks. maybe people think of sinkholes in different way. if there is one there are others to follow. does that happen in florida where one will go and then, you could see several others? or is it just completely random where sinkholes appear? >> well, the answer to your question is both. the it can be completely random and there also can be similarities where you have a cluster of sinkholes over a short period of time occur, and that may be random or it may be due to, you know, some kind of a change in water levels, for example, when tropical storm debbie moved through florida, in the wake of that, hundreds of sinkholes formed across the state. jenna: interesting. jonathan, thank you so much for your perspective. it is great to have you with us. woe don't know a lot about sinkholes. certainly the stories brought a lot of attention to them. thank you for the time today, and your expertise. >> my pleasure, jenna, have you heard about this? north korea issues an alar
is dazzling san francisco, a light sculpture brightens the night, 25,000 lights transform the bay bridge from gray to great. look at that. very cool. megyn:
that now close to san francisco. nasa says it needs money to detect small asteroids that are flying around in space before they hit us and this is why. >> there are some objects we know that are coming years in advance. there are other objects still big enough to cause damage, that we only know about weeks in advance or days in advance. obviously we need to improve the capability to give us a large amount of notice, enough notice to mount a deflection mission, if we see one on a collision course. jenna: chief astronomer derek pitts is with us. so, derek, how vulnerable are we? >> well the real, the reality of it, jenna, is that while there are some large objects out there, we know pretty well where the big ones are. it is the smaller ones that we really have to be concerned about but the truth is that your chances of being killed by a meteor striking you are about the sail of dying in an airplane crash. that means not very high at all. jenna: i'm afraid to fly. so, that comparison doesn't sit well with me, but go ahead, derek. >> you need a titanium umbrella, jenna. jenna: right. >> the pr
, and nobody in authority has said anything about it. claudia cowan is on the case live in san francisco, claudia. >> reporter: the state park's department in california is in damage control mode after becoming a symbol of government incompetent. for more than 13 years tens of thousands of tax dollars sat unused in hidden rainy day accounts even as the state was moving to close 70 parks and volunteers were desperately scraping together donation toss keep them open. at first it was thought to be an embarrassing accounting mistake, but according to an investigation by the attorney general's office parks officials deliberately kept the fund secret. to critics it says as much about bad management as about the mindset in sacramento. >> someone that is working within a department and an agency it almost becomes their own and they think of it as their own and they get very protective of it. and that culture that they have determines their behavior, and obviously in this case it was the wrong behavior. >> reporter: well thanks to a new state law the secret stash which whoever's around $54 millio
to strike but i can tell you as a san francisco native when they do it's still a little bit of a surprise. by the time this thing was all over at least 20 people were sent to the hospital. >> mass shootings shocked the nation last year grabbing plenty of headlines but our next guest says we need to look beyond the headlines and some of the issues under consideration right now and talk about the overwhelming impact of gun violence in minority communities. fox news political analyst juan williams has a column on race and gun debate in today's "wall street journal." i hope a lot of people read it, juan. it makes you think. we talk about maybe banning assault weapons and high capacity magazines and large capacity weaponry and so forth. you say there is a word that isn't being talked about that you think is very important. what is it? >> race. i think jon without a doubt when you look at the statistics they are just stunning. about half of all the murder in the country are murders of black and latino people. in fact it's more than half. and you think about it, you know, black people are about
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6